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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
, kathy. it's because of her i'm here today and here at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again. i'm glad i have broken that promise to myself and here. it's a pleasure to be on the podium again. we met in the '70s what we were both regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think that anymore. francis and i were asked by james mcgreger burns to be the co-chair of the american political science invention program. we came up with a program that even i think jim burns was a little alarmed by. he in fact put in to action. i have known francis since then. she has remained an honest and authentic voice of progressivism and radicalism with a deep interest with those they have shown -- the homeless and the poor. not how they can be helped but how they find ways to help themselves through the movement and work that they do. it's a pleasure to have her perspective this afternoon in responding to these comments. i'm very pleasured to jackie davis, the chairman of the -- and rachel and members of the executive committee the
and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we star
on water and wastewater infrastructure systems are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny,
financial officer has startled many in city hall. three days ago he quietly celebrated one of his finest moments on the job, when he announced the district was enjoying a $417 million budget surplus. today he announced his retirement. >> there are times when we have become exasperated with each other, but i think that is to be expected. there's a lot of passion involved and sometimes it gets put on display. then he took office in 2000 when the district was nearly broke. now they have nearly $1.5 billion of savings. some residents were grateful for his work, but they want more. >> employees such as myself, we need money to help our families. i>> we should budget for what we have and get it right. it should have been spent on something worthwhile. >> he has had controversy like the 2009 conviction of a tax office employe for embezzling $50 million from the city. recently a securities and exchange commission investigation. a columnist says overall, he will be remembered for helping revive the destruct. >> he presided over a good transition. >> the mayor called him an exemplary stored of the
of new york city is dead at the age of 88. >>> alaskan flight, the pilot passing out in the cockpit. the first officer forced to take control. >>> and the superstar and the super bowl, beyonce uses her singing voice to silence some of her critics. ♪ and the rockets red glare >> vowing to sing live on sunday as america gets set for its big game. >> and we're getting set with al in san francisco and natalie live in baltimore "today," friday, february 1st, 2013. >> announcer: from nbc news, this is "today" with matt lauer and savannah guthrie, live from studio 1a in rockefeller plaza. >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> good morning, everyone. i'm savannah guthrie. you did not have to grow up in new york city to know the name ed koch, who served as mayor for three terms from 1978 to 1989 and used his sometimes combative style to help rescue the city from near financial ruin. >> i did grow up around here. he was a force. when you would come across a voter, he would always say, how am i doing? am i doing okay? he died overnight at new york presb
ready for some football? i know that i am. not that there's much of a choice in my home city of new orleans. there's no ignoring it. super bowl xlvii has come to town. the superdome is the place to be. the baltimore ravens are facing off against the san francisco 49ers. itis the best i can do if it's not the new orleans saints. they will be join d by the 110 million people watching on television. they are a captive side show for super bowl ads. they are costing $4 million for each 30 second spot. they will take it all in while consuming 1.2 billion chicken wings. 4 million pizzas and 50 million cases of beer. there's no denying our love affair with the game. alongside those numbers, this year's super bowl comes with another set of numbers that made that love much more complicated than ever. these new numbers could make cte as ewe nonmouse with football as nfl. it's chronic traumatic enreceive lolg, a brain disease caused by trauma to the head and the scientific evidence points to the connection between this long-term brain disease and the concussions and collisions that are part of
to police go to wjz.com. >>> city police have identified the two people shot to death and left in a burning car last week. they're identified as 33-year- old alysia strickland and 34- year-old taewon tuck. the burning car was found in an alley on clifton avenue friday morning. the two people inside had gunshot wounds to their head and that strickland was a graduate student at morgan state university. >>> thousands descend on annapolis. they're pushing for a multibillion dollars construction plan to fix crumbling classrooms. wjz and mike schuh are live with the latest. >> good morning mike. >> reporter: good morning everyone. thousands say they need their voices to be heard. if you want to help maryland they say you must help baltimore first. >> a few thousand students, city leaders and concerned citizens rallied in front of the state house in annapolis monday. they are advocates for baltimore schools and demanding more money to fund them. >> it's time for better buildings, better baltimore, better maryland. >> phillipe jackson is the princ
>> for more information on tvs recent visit to santa fe, new mexico another city visited by her local content vehicle, visit c-span.org/local content. ..a?xx i first came to washington, d.c. in 2000 as a congressional correspondent for the associated press. after spending several years in colombia south carolina and albany new york. now, i am originally from mississippi, the son of two public school teachers come in and being from mississippi, the one thing my parents made sure that i knew was my history. it was almost a state requirement in mississippi to know where you came from. so, when i left mississippi to go to south carolina, i had this desire to history and i studied the history of south carolina. i didn't the same thing when i went to upstate new york. i got involved in learning the african-american history of upstate new york which, by the way, is very vibrant. a lot of the underground railroads ended in upstate new york city have a very vibrant african-american community and history up there. but when i left albany new york to come to washington, d.c., and i knew i
at an incredible rate of two to three inches an hour in some spots. >> up to 12 inches in new york city to an incredible 3 feet in parts of connecticut. boston got smacked with two feet, leaving people there with a new big dig to deal with. ron who used to live in boston will remember the big dig. it was the largest public works project in the history of mankind. we have a new project for boston now. >> an extreme weather team is where the snow is this morning. fanned out across the storm zone. with the latest on what's to come, how to handle it when you get back on the roads, as well. >> our coverage of the blizzard of 2013, sam champion and ginger zee. let's go first to sam, our weather editor in new york's columbus circle this morning. sam, good morning. >> good morning, dan and bianna. we're on a side street here. this is andrew. we've been helping him dig out from the snowfall totals. this is his car. we're going to get it out for him this morning. we have the eight inches of snow. andrew, i'll step on the other side of this. and you keep going. we got about that eight inches of sn
responsible for our own security. we've actually relied in over 275 different cities around the world, where our embassies and consulates are, we rely on host governments, on security forces, on the militaries and police forces in host countries so it's a joint responsibility, and obviously the state department will have to look into this and try to determine who is responsible. >> nicholas burns, former ambassador, thank you so much for joining us this morning. we'll have much more from turkey later on ins in ns s i"cnn news" >>> the colorful mayor of new york city has died, much beloved. his signature line? >> am i doing all right? am i doing okay? >> yeah, we remember that, the 88-year-old koch had been in and out of the hospital recently. he died of congestive heart failure. his funeral will be monday in a synagogue near central park. koch served three terms as mayor starting in 1978. he later found a new rule for his jubilant combative personality on the people's court and hosted a radio show and never left his beloved hometown. let's bring in john berman in new york, so what will be th
on the streets, you see cabs. not so much right now, huh? >> new york city, right? the city that never sleeps. this is a city that is in the middle of a deep slumber. when was the last time you saw the streets practically empty. look at the circle, columbus circle, practically empty. a couple cabs, maybe a snow plow if you're lucky, maybe a city bus. empty. it's like a white christmas today. isn't it? a winter wonderland. it is cold, i'll tell you that, but it's snowing and it's a quiet snow. not much wind going on. so really kind of a calm overhang on this evening in the middle of the night. the snow, though, is continuing to pile up. what i find interesting, though, is i really haven't seen many snow plows go by and the city has promised they were on patrol as of 7:00 tonight. perhaps they're in the boroughs in the neighborhoods making their way through. one interesting difference to this year, though, different from the blizzard that hit here in 2010, the city's kind of learned about it, learned from its mistakes, they have got kind of, brooke, a gps tracker of where the snow plows are. so
covering the major storm from all angles. we'll begin with the city that will get hit first, that is new york. alison kosik, do we understand if they're prepared? lost her. we'll go to susan candiotti in boston, another place the storm is hitting. we know there will be a lot, a lot, a lot of snow. are they ready? >> reporter: to put it bluntly, i think they are, we certainly hope they are. the city hopes bostonians are. certainly they and new englanders are used to huge nor'easters and blizzards like this. 35 years ago, you had the storm of '78, when they had more than 27 inches. this could rival those record amounts. we'll have to see what happens. but as of now, noontime is zero hour. a snow emergency has gone into effect and now people are being told that's it, get off the streets. if your car is there, it's going to ghettet towed. so certainly if take you a look at the store shelf, they are empty. it is clear that people have been fwg out within the last 24, 48 hours since these warnings began. buying all kinds of essential supplies, including nonperishable foods, water, batteries fl
. ♪ >> now for the happy segment. do you live in one of the most miserable cities in america? "forbes" magazine released its annual list for 2013 and the most miserable is detroit, the motor city earning the number within spot this year with its high crime rate, high unemployment and deep financial woes. forbes looked at unemployment, violent crime, taxes and commute times and the weather. most of the top ten included three cities from michigan, three from california and three from illinois. and then number ten, our great city here, new york. let's look at these pictures before and after in cadillac, michigan. this is the cadillac building, right? and that was before and after. that's the grand central station. greg, you noticed -- you pitched this story, which was a great one because you noticed a common denominator. >> yeah. almost all the mayors are democrat and the ones that claim they are democrats are very liberal, like michael bloomberg. he ran as a republican because he couldn't run as a democrat. it's funny, when you look at detroit, it looks like it was hit by a hurricane a
city was diverted due to an unruly passenger on board we're told. jet blue flight 185 landed in denver at 7:15. kusa reports it was a customer service issue between a flight attendant and female passenger. a federal air marshall got involved. once the individual was escorted off the plane the flight was back in the air. denver police, the tsa and fbi are now handling that investigation. back to youp. >> all right. tom costello, thank you so much. >> we're following another breaking news story. ed koch, former mayor of new york city has died. he was a towering political figure in the city who earned a reputation for his sometimes combative style. ron allen has more on koch's career in politics. good morning to you. >> good morning to you. ed koch was certainly a legendary iconic figure in new york. tributes and remembrances are pouring in. he was 88 and died of congestive heart failure. he's being remembered as a politician that got things done, did so in a way that left a lasting impression. >> hi! >> reporter: ed koch was a quintessential new yorker and one of the city's most popular
is expected to face questions from senate republicans say about his tenure at city group during its downward spiral during the 2008 financial crisis. political analysts say the growing will make for a tougher confirmation hearing and then white house officials and initially anticipated. flu would succeed to indict the are aware this resigned last month. little is currently the white house chief of staff. senators have expressed criticism of the $1 million bonus lu received shortly before see group got a $300 billion federal guarantee to take are the bank's elite mortgage-backed securities. and the report and the national hurricane center says super storm sandy was a deadly is hurricane to hit the northeast 40 years and the second most costly in the nation's history. the agency directly attribute 72 death and the u.s. from sandy at least 87 more deaths indirectly from causes like hypothermia do the power outages and taxes during cleanup efforts. the super storm also caused an estimated $50 billion in damage, the greater than any u.s. hurricane outside of katrina. >> good morning is 7:14 a.m.
protecting cops. this man is a threat to every person in los angeles. >> reporter: a city in fear is fighting back, offering a $1 million reward for dorner's capture and conviction. police have received more than 700 tips, including one that led them to this lowe's sunday night. the shooting spree began about a week ago when monica kwan and her fiance were shot to death in a parking lot. an alleged execution by dorner, who was angry at her father. a former los angeles police captain. >> to have your family targeted because they're related to you? that is absolutely terrifying. >> reporter: abc news learned that a man claiming to be dorner has called kwan's father to taunt him, telling the grieving dad he should have done a better job protecting his daughter. police have vowed to catch dorner, but for now the city can only hope the shooting doesn't start again. pierre thomas, abc news, los angeles. >> here's the scary part of this story. there are still 50 police officers whose families are being guarded. their family as are being guarded. we are talking about a force, how big and the police o
hometown. chicago. and address the growing gun violence gripping that city. trace gallagher has that part of our story. is he live in los angeles. hey, trace. >> and shannon if you look at the numbers in chicago you can see why the red alert is flashing in that city. look at this. last year there were 506 murders in the city of chicago. that's a 16% increase, a significant increase. take a rook just this year 42 homicides already on the exact same pace as last year. there have been seven murders in chicago in just the past five days. the mayor there rahm immanuel is now flooding the streets with police, taking cops who normally do administrative work and putting them in patrol cars. now, what really brought this to a head is the murder last week of 15-year-old pendleton, an honors student. she performed at events surrounding the inauguration. gunned down in a park near her school. police believe it was a case of mistaken identity. the reverend jesse jackson led a march this weekend to the park where she was shot and killed. jackson is now calling on president obama to step in and help his
city, the editor-in-chief, they sent us the editor-in-chief. >> that's huge. >> take us through this fascinate i fascinating governorial race. the former chief, ken cuccinelli and the former chief, terry mcauliffe. >> it's what you talk about, the divide in the republican party. ken is really conservative and the guy elbowed aside, bill boeing says there's a 50-50 chance he will run as independent. if he does, he will get a lot of independent support in virginia. the point of politics to talk to yourself and feel good about ideological ideological purity, what cuccinelli feel good about and saying neither of these guys are palatable, we don't want an old clinton hand and there's got to be a middle and the question is whether an independent candidacy might represent that. >> when you say really really conservative, how conservative is he? what do you mean? what are some of his positions? >> he's motivated by social conservati conservatism. as attorney general he got involved in this dispute in virginia where he was cracking down on scientists who disagree with his view on global
's coming up this hour. >>> we'll also take you to a unique school here in new york city. it's aim is to teach a wide variety of kids of different abilities and backgrounds all in the same classroom. >>> we want to remind you about this friday's friday field trip. savannah, natalie, willie and i are going to miami. that's right. we're hitting the south beach, south beach wine and food festival and everything it entails. in fact, savannah, willie and matt will be my celebrity helpers at the barbecue thursday night. >> we're going to be your sous chefs because i can't cook. >> wondering why he couldn't have been invited to that show. >> miami show with the barbecue, can you really grill, al? >> oh, yeah. >> he grills good. >> i have two barbecue cookbooks. >> oh, that's right. >> come on. i'm ready to go. >> and you used to have a little weight on you. >> that's right. i used to wear that pregnancy empathy suit. >> a lot to get to with our celebrity co-host steve harvey. let's get to natalie morales with a check of the top headlines this morning. >>> good morning to you once again. l
advantage of it, without unduly exposing it to our adversaries. let me move on to private city and civil liberties. anytime you're talking about sharing the information, sharing information with respect to cybersecurity, you have to be conscious of privacy and civil liberties and you have to make sure those are protected. that has been a priority of the administration and it continues to be so. so, while there are perhaps fewer concerns in the executive order because the focus is on sharing information outward, we have established a robust, oversight regime and in particular we have highlighted the fips. that is the government speak, right? if i don't insert an acronym every two or three minutes it is just not fun. the fips are the fair information practice principles. these date back to the 1970's when they were developed dealing with health records. essentially it is what are the principles you need to use in considering privacy with respect to information? so we think it's important we establish these as a one of the principles that we're going to follow with respect to sharing inform
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)